Uniform Rules For Demand Guarantees - URDG

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DEFINITION of 'Uniform Rules For Demand Guarantees - URDG'

A set of rules developed by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and adopted in 1992. URDG provides a framework for harmonizing international trading practices and establishes agreed-upon rules for independent guarantees and counter-guarantees among trading partners. The guarantees specify uniform practices for securing payment and performance in worldwide commercial contracts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Uniform Rules For Demand Guarantees - URDG'

The World Bank and the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) have adopted the URDG into their standards for financing international trade. The ICC's publication, Uniform Rules for Demand Guarantees, is considered an authoritative guide and reflects international practice in the use of demand guarantees, while preserving the goal of the original rules – to balance the interests of the trading parties and curb abuse in the development of international trade guarantees.

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