U.S. House Financial Services Committee

AAA

DEFINITION of 'U.S. House Financial Services Committee'

The congressional committee responsible for monitoring, writing legislation and enforcing existing laws that affect the financial services and housing-related industries in the U.S. Committee members - who are elected members of the U.S. House of Representatives - oversee all businesses and organizations involved in securities, insurance, banking, housing and real estate.


It also has oversight for several federal departments, agencies, government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs) and internationally-affiliated organizations including: Fannie Mae (Federal National Mortgage Association), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), Federal Reserve Bank, Freddie Mac (Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation), International Monetary Fund and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'U.S. House Financial Services Committee'

The U.S. House Financial Services Committee was formed in 1865 and was originally known as the Committee on Banking and Currency. Its Senate counterpart is the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing & Urban Affairs. There are 70 congressional members on the House Committee - the majority of members are from the current party holding the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Federal Reserve Bank

    The central bank of the United States and the most powerful financial ...
  2. U.S. Department of Housing and ...

    A U.S. government agency created in 1965 to support community ...
  3. Fannie Mae - Federal National Mortgage ...

    A government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) that was created in 1938 ...
  4. The World Bank

    An international organization dedicated to providing financing, ...
  5. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ...

    The U.S. corporation insuring deposits in the U.S. against bank ...
  6. Freddie Mac - Federal Home Loan ...

    A stockholder-owned, government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) chartered ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Can small investors buy collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs)?

    Collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs), which are pools of mortgage-backed securities (MBS), are available to smaller ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between an option-adjusted spread and a Z-spread in reference ...

    Unlike the Z-spread calculation, the option-adjusted spread takes into account how the embedded option in a bond can change ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some historical examples of debt securitization?

    The first debt securities were probably sovereign debt assets that were transferred from the British government to mercantilist ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What price-to-book ratio is considered average in the chemicals sector?

    You can use Microsoft Excel to calculate the loan-to-value ratio if you have the mortgage amount and appraised value of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do externalities affect equilibrium and create market failure?

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) was created in 1945 and is governed by and accountable to its 188 member countries. ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I use the correlation coefficient to predict returns in the stock market?

    Simple interest is most commonly seen in short-term loans, such as those from payday lenders or pawn shops. You might see ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    How The Sarbanes-Oxley Era Affected IPOs

    After the infamous collapse of companies like Tyco, Enron and WorldCom, the government responded to try and prevent it from happening again.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Lobbying: K Street's Influence On Wall Street

    Corporate lobbyists have the power, influence and political backing to affect your portfolio. Find out how.
  3. Investing Basics

    Subprime Lending: Helping Hand Or Underhanded?

    These loans can spell disaster for borrowers, but that doesn't mean they should be condemned.
  4. Credit & Loans

    The History Of Consumer Credit Rights

    The Fair Credit Billing Act of 1974 gave consumers the power to dispute credit card charges.
  5. Insurance

    Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac And The Credit Crisis Of 2008

    Is the U.S. Congress' failure to rein in these mortgage giants to blame for the financial fallout?
  6. Home & Auto

    What Are The Tax Advantages Of Buying A Home?

    Don't forget these deductions and credits that homeowners can use to reduce their tax bill.
  7. Economics

    What is the International Monetary Fund?

    The International Monetary Fund fosters global monetary cooperation and sustainable economic growth.
  8. Forex

    The Gold Standard Versus Fiat Currency

    What do "gold standard" and "fiat system" mean for currencies and economies? Investopedia explores the history of the gold standard and the rise of fiat.
  9. Credit & Loans

    How To Finance Foreign Real Estate

    If you don't pay cash, financing real estate abroad is likely to cost more than at home. Watch for local laws and be sure your rights are protected.
  10. Economics

    Explaining the Glass-Steagall Act

    An act the U.S. Congress passed in 1933 as the Banking Act, which prohibited commercial banks from participating in the investment banking business.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center