UST

DEFINITION of 'UST'

The abbreviation for the United States Treasury. UST is commonly used for references to the Treasury debt that the U.S. issues. Traders will often use the phrases 'UST yields' or 'UST curve' to refer to Treasury yields or the Treasury yield curve.

BREAKING DOWN 'UST'

The U.S. Treasury is the department of government that is responsible for issuing debt in the form of Treasury bonds, bills and notes. Some of the government branches operating under the U.S. Treasury umbrella include the IRS, U.S. Mint, Bureau of the Public Debt, and the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Bureau.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between the Daily Treasury Long-Term Rates and the Daily Treasury ...

    Find out more about the daily Treasury long-term rates, daily Treasury yield curve rates and the difference between these ... Read Answer >>
  2. Which economic factors impact treasury yields?

    Discover the economic factors that impact Treasury yields. Treasury yields are the benchmark yield for the rest of the world, ... Read Answer >>
  3. Why are treasury bond yields important to investors of other securities?

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  4. Where on the Internet can I find yield curves over various periods?

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  5. Below is an example of US Treasury yields for various maturities ...

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