UST

DEFINITION of 'UST'

The abbreviation for the United States Treasury. UST is commonly used for references to the Treasury debt that the U.S. issues. Traders will often use the phrases 'UST yields' or 'UST curve' to refer to Treasury yields or the Treasury yield curve.

BREAKING DOWN 'UST'

The U.S. Treasury is the department of government that is responsible for issuing debt in the form of Treasury bonds, bills and notes. Some of the government branches operating under the U.S. Treasury umbrella include the IRS, U.S. Mint, Bureau of the Public Debt, and the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Bureau.

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    Find out more about the daily Treasury long-term rates, daily Treasury yield curve rates and the difference between these ... Read Answer >>
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    Learn about the wide-ranging impact of U.S. Treasury Bond yields on all other interest-bearing instruments in the economy ... Read Answer >>
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    Find out where to locate reliable yield curve information on the Internet, including the U.S. Department of the Treasury ... Read Answer >>
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