U.S. Treasury

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DEFINITION of 'U.S. Treasury'

Created in 1798, the United States Department of the Treasury is the government (Cabinet) department responsible for issuing all Treasury bonds, notes and bills. Some of the government branches operating under the U.S. Treasury umbrella include the IRS, U.S. Mint, Bureau of the Public Debt, and the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Bureau.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'U.S. Treasury'

Generally speaking, the U.S. Treasury is responsible for the revenue of the U.S. government, but here are some other key functions:

- Printing of bills, postage, Federal Reserve notes, and minting of coins
- Collection of taxes and enforcement of tax laws (through the IRS)
- Management of all government accounts and debt issues
- Overseeing U.S. banks

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