Utility Revenue Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Utility Revenue Bond'

A type of municipal bond that is issued to finance utility projects, such as electrical plants, water systems, sewer systems or any other type of public utility. A utility revenue bond is repaid from monies earned through the utility improvements, once the project has been completed and the utility is operating.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Utility Revenue Bond'

A bond is an interest-bearing or discounted debt security that is issued by a government or corporation in order to raise funds for capital projects. Generally, utility revenue bonds have one year's worth of debt service in what is called a reserve fund, to protect bondholders in the event that the project is not completed on time (and is not earning revenue) or where revenues are otherwise less than anticipated.


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