Value-Added Reseller

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DEFINITION of 'Value-Added Reseller'

A firm that enhances the value of the products it resells by including complementary products or services, usually as part of a package deal. Value-added resellers play a prominent role in the computer industry, and may provide additional hardware, installation services, consulting, troubleshooting, or other related products or services.

BREAKING DOWN 'Value-Added Reseller'

Value-added resellers form an important part in the distribution chain for many products. They are able to make higher profit margins if they effectively manage their value-added services. Many car dealerships attempt to be value-added resellers by adding on additional features such as custom parts and services. These features typically earn a high profit margin for the dealership.



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RELATED FAQS
  1. What role does the OEM (original equipment manufacturer) play in the finished product?

    Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) do not typically play much of direct role in determining the finished product. However, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between an OEM (original equipment manufacturer) and a VAR ...

    An original equipment manufacturer (OEM) is a company that manufactures a basic product or a component product, such as a ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of companies that are Value-Added Resellers?

    Among the most common value-added resellers are computer retailers and service companies, automobile dealerships and furniture ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can I invest in electronic retailing (e-tailing)?

    Electronic retail is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. Every year, more people are choosing to purchase ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between JIT (just in time) and CMI (customer managed inventory)?

    Just-in-time (JIT) inventory management focuses solely on the need to replenish inventory only when it is required, reducing ... Read Full Answer >>
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    There are many ways to achieve product differentiation, some more common than others. Horizontal Differentiation Horizontal ... Read Full Answer >>

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