Value-Added Reseller

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DEFINITION of 'Value-Added Reseller'

A firm that enhances the value of the products it resells by including complementary products or services, usually as part of a package deal. Value-added resellers play a prominent role in the computer industry, and may provide additional hardware, installation services, consulting, troubleshooting, or other related products or services.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Value-Added Reseller'

Value-added resellers form an important part in the distribution chain for many products. They are able to make higher profit margins if they effectively manage their value-added services. Many car dealerships attempt to be value-added resellers by adding on additional features such as custom parts and services. These features typically earn a high profit margin for the dealership.



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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some examples of companies that are Value-Added Resellers?

    Among the most common value-added resellers are computer retailers and service companies, automobile dealerships and furniture ... Read Full Answer >>
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