Value Change

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DEFINITION of 'Value Change'

An adjustment made to a stock's price to reflect the number of outstanding stock shares, or shares of stock that have been issued and are currently held by investors. A value change allows the group of stocks to be equally weighted and, therefore, more easily evaluated. Since the number of shares held by investors changes daily, this number can be updated daily to reflect the changes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Value Change'

A value change adjustment is intended to equally weight the stocks that are included in a group. Value change can be used in a variety of settings and describes a type of calculation used to compare and evaluate investment instruments by taking the number of shares held by investors into consideration .

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