Value Engineering

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DEFINITION of 'Value Engineering'

A systematic and organized approach to provide the necessary functions in a project at the lowest cost. Value engineering promotes the substitution of materials and methods with less expensive alternatives, without sacrificing functionality. It is focused solely on the functions of various components and materials, rather than their physical attributes. Also called value analysis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Value Engineering'

The concept of value engineering evolved in the 1940s at General Electric, in the midst of World War II. Due to the war, purchase engineer Lawrence Miles and others sought substitutes for materials and components, since there was a chronic shortage of them. These substitutes were often found to reduce costs and provided equal or better performance.

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