Value Added

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DEFINITION of 'Value Added'

The enhancement a company gives its product or service before offering the product to customers. Value added is used to describe instances where a firm takes a product that may be considered a homogeneous product, with few differences (if any) from that of a competitor, and provides potential customers with a feature or add-on that gives it a greater sense of value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Value Added'

A value add can either increase the product's price or value. For example, offering one year of free support on a new computer would be a value-added feature. Additionally, individuals can bring value add to services that they perform, such as bringing advanced financial modeling skills to a position in which the hiring manager may not have foreseen the need for such skills.

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