Value-Added Tax - VAT

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DEFINITION of 'Value-Added Tax - VAT'

A type of consumption tax that is placed on a product whenever value is added at a stage of production and at final sale. Value-added tax (VAT) is most often used in the European Union. The amount of value-added tax that the user pays is the cost of the product, less any of the costs of materials used in the product that have already been taxed.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Value-Added Tax - VAT'

For example when a television is built by a company in Europe the manufacturer is charged a value-added tax on all of the supplies they purchase for producing the television. Once the television reaches the shelf, the consumer who purchases it must pay the value-added tax that applies to him or her.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some of the arguments against a value added tax (VAT)?

    Critics of the value-added tax, or VAT, system say that not only is it costlier to implement compared to the ad valorem system, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of a value added tax?

    A value-added tax (VAT) is a consumption tax levied on products at every point of sale where value has been added, starting ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some of the arguments in favor of a value-added tax (VAT)?

    A value-added tax (VAT) offers several advantages over an income tax or traditional sales tax. It raises needed government ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some of the arguments for and against a Value Added Tax (VAT)?

    A value-added tax (VAT) is a type of consumption tax placed on a product whenever value is added at a stage of production ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the tax incentives or disincentives to vertical integration?

    In certain jurisdictions, such as the countries that are members of the European Union, there is a system of taxation called ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is Value-Added Tax (VAT) and who pays it?

    Value-added tax (VAT) is a consumption tax, meaning that it is a tax on the purchase of a product or a service. It is a form ... Read Full Answer >>
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