Valued Marine Policy

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DEFINITION of 'Valued Marine Policy'

A type of insurance coverage that places a specific value on the insured property, such as the hull or cargo of a shipping vessel. A valued marine policy pays up to, or in its entirety, the specified value in the event of a total loss. It differs from an unvalued marine policy where the value of the property would be determined following the event of a loss. Marine insurance provides coverage against losses sustained by ships, cargo and terminals.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Valued Marine Policy'

The value is determined ahead of time in a valued marine policy, and there is generally no reassessment or revaluation necessary in the event of an insured event or loss. A valued policy pays a pre-determined amount regardless of the extent of the damages, as long as it is considered a total loss. It is important to note that if the insured item depreciates in value, it will not affect the amount which can be claimed in the event of a total loss. The same is also true if the value of the item appreciates - the insured is unable to receive any addition damages based on the increase value of the item.

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