Vancouver Stock Exchange (VAN) .V

DEFINITION of 'Vancouver Stock Exchange (VAN) .V'

A defunct stock exchange formerly located in Vancouver, British Columbia. A large number of small cap and exploration companies' stocks were traded on this exchange. The Vancouver Stock Exchange finally merged into the Canadian Venture Exchange in 1999.

BREAKING DOWN 'Vancouver Stock Exchange (VAN) .V'

At one point the VSE listed about 2,300 stocks, a great many of which apparently were not very successful. The exchange provides a textbook example of how errors in floating point calculations can lead to enormous discrepancies in the correctness of the index reading. Ultimately, the VSE is an example of one of the world's less successful stock exchanges.

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