Variable Coupon Renewable Note - VCR

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DEFINITION of 'Variable Coupon Renewable Note - VCR'

A renewable fixed income security with variable coupon rates that are periodically reset. A Variable Coupon Renewable Note is a type of debt security with a weekly maturity. The principal of this security is reinvested automatically at new interest rates, every week it matures.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Variable Coupon Renewable Note - VCR'

Usually the coupon is set on a weekly basis at a fixed spread over the T-bill rate. The security is reinvested automatically, continuously, until the owner of the security requests that the security is no longer reinvested. The initial rate of this security is linked to the T-bill rate, which is backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government. T-bills have a maturity of one year or less.

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