Variable Price Limit


DEFINITION of 'Variable Price Limit'

A schedule of price variations above or below the accepted limits determined by the commodities exchanges for any one trading day.

BREAKING DOWN 'Variable Price Limit'

Variable price limits allow contracts to trade past their maximum daily changes. Exchanges determine whether a futures contract be assigned a variable price limit as it is generally used for commodities with high transaction volumes.

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