Variance Swap

DEFINITION of 'Variance Swap'

A type of volatility swap where the payout is linear to variance rather than volatility. Therefore, the payout will rise at a higher rate than volatility

BREAKING DOWN 'Variance Swap'

Variance is the square of standard deviation. Because of this, a variance swaps' payout will be larger than that of a volatility swap, as these products are based upon variance rather than standard deviation.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between standard deviation and variance?

    Understand the difference between standard deviation and variance; learn how each is calculated and how these concepts are ... Read Answer >>
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    Learn how high variance stocks are good for some investors and how diversified portfolios can reduce variance without compromising ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between variance and standard deviation?

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  4. How much variance should an investor have in an indexed fund?

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  5. What is price variance in cost accounting?

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  6. How is an unfavorable variance discovered?

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