Venture Capital Funds

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DEFINITION of 'Venture Capital Funds'

An investment fund that manages money from investors seeking private equity stakes in startup and small- and medium-size enterprises with strong growth potential. These investments are generally characterized as high-risk/high-return opportunities.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Venture Capital Funds'

Theoretically, venture capital funds give individual investors the ability to get in early at a company's startup stage or in special situations in which there is opportunity for explosive growth. In the past, venture capital investments were only accessible to professional venture capitalists. While a fund structure diversifies risk, these funds are inherently risky.

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