Vendor Note

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Vendor Note'

A type of debt instrument used in a particular type of short-term loan agreement in which the seller of goods or merchandise sells them to the buyer, but also provides financing for the buyer in the form of a vendor note. The loan is secured by the inventory being sold to the buyer as well as pledges of the buyer's business assets and similar forms of security used to help lessen the perceived risk of the buyer's default.

Also known as a seller note.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Vendor Note'

Vendor notes can be a useful and convenient form of financing, particularly when well-established sellers with diverse customer bases are taking on new, smaller buyers who typically have small amounts of working capital with which to purchase inventory. The use of vendor financing can make it easier for a company to increase its sales volume, but in doing so it also incurs the risk of the buyers it finances not paying back their loans.

Vendor notes vary in terms of their time to maturity, but notes with time horizons in the range of three to five years are considered common. Many different types of terms and conditions can be built into a vendor note, such as limitations on the types of business practices the buyer can engage in, restrictions on acquiring other inventory or business assets and requirements that specific financial ratios or benchmarks be maintained.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Vendor

    The party in the supply chain that makes goods and services available ...
  2. Volume Discount

    A financial incentive for individuals or businesses that purchase ...
  3. Invoice

    A commercial document that itemizes a transaction between a buyer ...
  4. Accounts Receivable - AR

    Money owed by customers (individuals or corporations) to another ...
  5. Write-Down

    Reducing the book value of an asset because it is overvalued ...
  6. Write-Off

    A reduction in the value of an asset or earnings by the amount ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do a corporation's shareholders influence its Board of Directors?

    The 21st century has seen a rapid increase in shareholder activism, such as the general awareness, involvement and influence ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is a 'busted' convertible bond?

    In finance, a convertible bond represents a hybrid security that offers debt and equity features and risks. While a convertible ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What protections are in place for a whistleblower?

    Whistleblowers can play a critical role in ensuring the compliance, safety, honesty and legal fairness of governments and ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some types of financial netting?

    Whenever two parties in any financial relationship square up or consolidate their accounts with one another, it is called ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Can I buy insurance to reduce unlimited liability in a partnership?

    Partnership insurance is actually quite common. Most of the time, partners buy insurance to safeguard against the possibility ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) mean in the utilities sector?

    Traditionally, a power purchase agreement, or PPA, is a contract between a government agency and a private utilities company. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Measuring Company Efficiency

    Three useful indicators for measuring a retail company's efficiency are its inventory turnaround times, its receivables and its collection period.
  2. Investing Basics

    Understanding The Cash Conversion Cycle

    Find out how a simple calculation can help you uncover the most efficient companies.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    Dynamic Current Ratio: What It Is And How To Use It

    Learn why this ratio may be a good alternative to the current, cash and quick ratios.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What are Floating-Rate Notes?

    A floating-rate note is a debt instrument with an interest rate that “floats,” or varies. They are also called floaters.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Net Debt to EBITDA Ratio

    Financial analysts typically use the net debt to EBITDA ratio to determine a company’s ability to pay its debt.
  6. Investing

    What Can A Conference Call Tell About Trends?

    Messages in a company conference call can be easily misconstrued. But there is a way to cut through the talking points to get to the real substance.
  7. Economics

    Explaining the Supply Chain

    A supply chain is the cumulative network involved in moving raw materials, components and finished products from original suppliers to end users.
  8. Investing

    Five Portfolio Moves For The Second Half

    After a relatively calm few months, market volatility is back. If you are an investor, we help you prepare your portfolio with these five portfolio moves.
  9. Entrepreneurship

    Lockheed Martin Is Tight With The US Government

    The relationship between Lockheed Martin and the U.S. government is long-standing and the company's biggest revenue source, but it may be deteriorating.
  10. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Junk Bonds: Does High Yield Equal Extreme Risk?

    High-yield bonds present a lot of risks but do they outweigh the rewards? Here are some ETFs to consider, with caution.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  2. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  3. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  4. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  5. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
  6. Touchline

    The highest price that a buyer of a particular security is willing to pay and the lowest price at which a seller is willing ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!