Vendor

DEFINITION of 'Vendor'

The party in the supply chain that makes goods and services available to companies or consumers. The term vendor is typically used to describe the entity that is paid for the goods that are provided, rather than the manufacturer of the goods. A vendor, however, can operate both as the supplier of goods (seller) and the manufacturer.



Also known as a "supplier".

BREAKING DOWN 'Vendor'

A vendor is a person or a business entity that sells something. Large retail stores generally have a list of vendors from which they purchase goods (at wholesale) to sell (at retail) to their customers. Vendors can also sell directly to the customer, as seen with street vendors. In addition, a vendor can provide parts for another business that will be used to make an end product.




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