Venn Diagram

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DEFINITION of 'Venn Diagram'

An illustration that uses overlapping or non-overlapping circles to show the relationship between finite groups of things. This type of diagram gets its name from John Venn, who introduced the illustration in 1880. Where the circles overlap, items have a specified something in common. Where the circles do not overlap, the items do not have a specified something in common.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Venn Diagram'

In the Venn diagram below, circle A contains red fruit, circle B contains orange fruit, and the intersections of the two circles contains fruits that can be either red or orange (or even both red and orange at the same time).

Venn Diagram for Investopedia Feb Term.j
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