Vertical Integration

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What is 'Vertical Integration'

When a company expands its business into areas that are at different points on the same production path, such as when a manufacturer owns its supplier and/or distributor. Vertical integration can help companies reduce costs and improve efficiency by decreasing transportation expenses and reducing turnaround time, among other advantages. However, sometimes it is more effective for a company to rely on the expertise and economies of scale of other vendors rather than be vertically integrated.

BREAKING DOWN 'Vertical Integration'

Backward and forward integration are types of vertical integration. A company that expands backward on the production path has backward integration, while a company that expands forward on the production path is forward integrated.

Examples of vertical integration include:

- A mortgage company that both originates and services mortgages, meaning that it both lends money to homebuyers and collects their monthly payments.

- A solar power company that produces photovoltaic products and also manufacturers the cells, wafers and modules to create those products would be considered vertically integrated.

- The merger of Live Nation and Ticketmaster created a vertically integrated entertainment company that manages and represents artists, produces shows and sells event tickets.

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RELATED FAQS
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    Learn if there are any differences between backward integration and vertical integration. Learn where on the production line ... Read Answer >>
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  4. What are the legal barriers to vertical integration?

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  5. What are the most famous instances of backward integration?

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