Vertical Merger

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DEFINITION of 'Vertical Merger'

A merger between two companies producing different goods or services for one specific finished product. A vertical merger occurs when two or more firms, operating at different levels within an industry's supply chain, merge operations. Most often the logic behind the merger is to increase synergies created by merging firms that would be more efficient operating as one.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Vertical Merger'

In vertical mergers, by directly merging with suppliers, a company can decrease reliance and increase profitability. An example of a vertical merger is a car manufacturer purchasing a tire company. Such a vertical merger would reduce the cost of tires for the automaker and potentially expand business to supply tires to competing automakers.

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