DEFINITION of 'Viator'

A person with terminal or a life-threatening illness who sells their life insurance policy at a steep discount to an insurance firm to pay for their health-care costs or improve their quality of life.


A viator will usually receive a percentage of the policy's face value, around 50-70%, in a cash payment. This is one way in which an individual is able to receive money to help with medical coverage.

  1. Viatical Settlement

    An arrangement in which someone with a terminal disease sells ...
  2. Life Insurance

    A protection against the loss of income that would result if ...
  3. Face Value

    The nominal value or dollar value of a security stated by the ...
  4. Insurance

    A contract (policy) in which an individual or entity receives ...
  5. Clean Sheeting

    The fraudulent act of purchasing a life insurance policy without ...
  6. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the ...
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