Vanguard Exchange-Traded Funds

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DEFINITION of 'Vanguard Exchange-Traded Funds'

A class of ETFs offered by Vanguard and traded like any other share on the American Stock Exchange. There are presently 27 Vanguard ETFs with underlying indexes covering both individual sectors (such as materials and energy)as well as domestic and international indexes. Previously known as VIPERS, the ETFs are designed to track their underlying indexes as closely as possible and offer the increased flexibility of intraday trading.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Vanguard Exchange-Traded Funds'

Vanguard looks to bring its leadership in the passive management market to the ETF space with this class of low-cost funds. Most of the underlying indexes are Morgan Stanley (MSCI) indexes, which cover not only equity sectors of the economy, but also small-, mid- and large-cap equity indexes. There are also ETFs for broad-based market indexes such as the Wilshire Composite (a unit of Dow Jones), which tracks more than 3,500 stocks.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Is it possible to invest in an index?

    First, let's review the definition of an index. An index is essentially an imaginary portfolio of securities representing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can you short sell ETFs?

    ETFs (an acronym for exchange-traded funds) are treated like stock on exchanges; as such, they are also allowed to be sold ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Who's in charge of managing exchange-traded funds?

    An exchange-traded fund (ETF) is a security that tracks an index but has the flexibility of trading like a stock. Just like ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between iShares, VIPERs and Spiders?

    iShares, VIPERs and spiders each represent different exchange-traded fund (ETF) families. In other words, an individual company ... Read Full Answer >>
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