Viral Site

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DEFINITION of 'Viral Site'

A website that has become so popular that word of mouth and links generate an abnormally large amount of traffic to the site. Viral sites typically become popular through being forwarded to friends and family, who then forward it to their own network, causing the traffic to the site to grow exponentially.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Viral Site'

Viral sites and content are desired in order to generate revenue through advertising or product sales. The downside of a huge increase in traffic could be the failure of the website servers to handle the number of users.

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