Visible Supply

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Visible Supply'

The amount of a good that is currently being stored or transported. The visible supply is the amount of goods or commodities that are available to be bought or sold. This supply is important as it identifies a definite quantity of good available for purchase or delivery upon futures contracts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Visible Supply'

The price of a good is not completely influenced by the amount of visible supply. Because commodities, such as wheat, are often purchased through futures contracts long before delivery, prices are more likely to be influenced by future supply rather than what is available at that moment. In general, an increase in visible supply is considered to be a bearish signal, while a decrease is considered a bullish one.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Certificated Stock

    The stock of a commodity that has been inspected by qualified ...
  2. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with ...
  3. Approved Delivery Facility

    A facility authorized by an exchange to be used as a location ...
  4. In Sight

    A term describing deliverable grades of commodities underlying ...
  5. Invisible Supply

    Physical stocks of a commodity that are available for delivery ...
  6. On Track

    1. A type of commodities delivery for futures contracts that ...
Related Articles
  1. An Overview Of Commodities Trading
    Options & Futures

    An Overview Of Commodities Trading

  2. How To Invest In Commodities
    Investing Basics

    How To Invest In Commodities

  3. Play Foreign Currencies Against The ...
    Forex Education

    Play Foreign Currencies Against The ...

  4. Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge
    Active Trading

    Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge

Hot Definitions
  1. Gross Rate Of Return

    The total rate of return on an investment before the deduction of any fees or expenses. The gross rate of return is quoted ...
  2. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  3. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy starts to follow a particular pattern or trend. Leading indicators ...
  4. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  5. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  6. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
Trading Center