Visual Basic For Applications - VBA

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DEFINITION of 'Visual Basic For Applications - VBA'

A computer programming language developed by Microsoft which allows the development of user-defined functions and the automation of certain processes and calculations. Visual Basic For Applications is a standard feature of Microsoft Office products.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Visual Basic For Applications - VBA'

Visual Basic For Applications allows user a level of customization beyond what is typically available in Microsoft Office products, such as Excel, Word and Power Point. A user types commands into an editing module to create a macro. Macros can allow the user to automatically generate customized reports, charts and perform other data processing functions. Within the finance industry, VBA for Excel is commonly used to develop and maintain complex financial spreadsheet models.

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