Voluntary Export Restraint - VER

DEFINITION of 'Voluntary Export Restraint - VER'

A trade restriction on the quantity of a good that an exporting country is allowed to export to another country. This limit is self-imposed by the exporting country. Typically, VERs are a result of requests made by the importing country to provide a measure of protection for its domestic businesses that produce substitute goods. VERs are often created because the exporting countries would prefer to impose their own restrictions than risk sustaining worse terms from tariffs and/or quotas.

BREAKING DOWN 'Voluntary Export Restraint - VER'

The most notable example of VERs is when Japan imposed a VER on its auto exports into the U.S. as a result of American pressure in the 1980s. The VER subsequently gave the U.S. auto industry some protection against a flood of foreign competition.

However, there are ways in which a company can avoid a VER. For example, the exporting country's company can always build a manufacturing plant in the country to which exports would be directed. By doing so, the company will no longer need to export goods, and should not be bound by its country's VER.

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