Voodoo Economics

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DEFINITION of 'Voodoo Economics'

A slanderous term used by George H. W. Bush in reference to President Ronald Reagan's economic policies, which came to be known as "Reaganomics".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Voodoo Economics'

Before President Bush became Reagan's vice president, he viewed his eventual running mate's economic policies less than favorably.

Reagan was a proponent of supply-side economics, favoring reduced income and capital gains tax rates.

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