Voting Trust Certificate

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DEFINITION of 'Voting Trust Certificate'

A certificate issued by the limited-life trust of a corporation established to limit the control of a corporation to a few individuals. A voting trust certificate is issued to a stockholder in exchange for their common stock, and represents all of the normal rights of a shareholder except the right to vote. The life of a voting trust certificate is usually limited to five years, at which point the common stock, with voting rights, is returned to the shareholder.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Voting Trust Certificate'

A voting trust certificate allows a few individuals, known as voting trustees, to gain control and make decisions regarding the corporation without interference. The purpose is typically to allow reorganization when a corporation is in financial turmoil.

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