Voting Shares


DEFINITION of 'Voting Shares'

Shares that give the stockholder the right to vote on matters of corporate policy making as well as who will compose the members of the board of directors.

BREAKING DOWN 'Voting Shares'

Different classes of shares, such as preferred stock, sometimes don't allow for voting rights.

  1. Preferred Stock

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  3. Voting Right

    The right of a stockholder to vote on matters of corporate policy ...
  4. Statutory Voting

    A corporate voting procedure in which each shareholder is entitled ...
  5. Stockholders' Equity

    The portion of the balance sheet that represents the capital ...
  6. Non-Controlling Interest

    An ownership stake in a corporation where the held position gives ...
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  1. How is taxation treated for both the parent and subsidiary company during a spinoff?

    A common separation strategy used by corporations includes divestiture activities that segment a portion of a company's operations, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do companies issue preferred stock?

    There are a number of ways companies can raise funds to finance upcoming projects, expansion and other high costs associated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Who is responsible for protecting and managing shareholders' interests?

    The average shareholder, who is typically not involved in the day-to-day operations of the company, relies on several parties ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. If I own a stock in a company, do I get a say in the company's operations?

    You don't get a direct say in a company's day-to-day operations, but, depending on whether you own voting or non-voting stock, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the investor rights movement?

    The investor rights movement, also called shareholder activism, refers to the efforts of shareholders of publicly traded ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What types of capital are not considered share capital?

    The money a business uses to fund operations or growth is called capital, and there are a number of capital sources available. ... Read Full Answer >>

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