Voting Shares

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DEFINITION of 'Voting Shares'

Shares that give the stockholder the right to vote on matters of corporate policy making as well as who will compose the members of the board of directors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Voting Shares'

Different classes of shares, such as preferred stock, sometimes don't allow for voting rights.

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  2. Why do companies issue preferred stock?

    There are a number of ways companies can raise funds to finance upcoming projects, expansion and other high costs associated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Who is responsible for protecting and managing shareholders' interests?

    The average shareholder, who is typically not involved in the day-to-day operations of the company, relies on several parties ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. If I own a stock in a company, do I get a say in the company's operations?

    You don't get a direct say in a company's day-to-day operations, but, depending on whether you own voting or non-voting stock, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the investor rights movement?

    The investor rights movement, also called shareholder activism, refers to the efforts of shareholders of publicly traded ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Is a company's paid in capital affected by the trading of its shares in the secondary ...

    The amount of paid-in capital a company has is not affected by the trading of its shares on the secondary market. Paid-in ... Read Full Answer >>
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