Voting Shares

What are 'Voting Shares'

Voting shares are shares that give the stockholder the right to vote on matters of corporate policy making as well as who will compose the members of the board of directors.

BREAKING DOWN 'Voting Shares'

Different classes of shares, such as preferred stock, sometimes don't allow for voting rights.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. If I own a stock in a company, do I get a say in the company's operations?

    You don't get a direct say in a company's day-to-day operations, but, depending on whether you own voting or non-voting stock, ... Read Answer >>
  2. What can shareholders vote on?

    Understand the usual voting rights of common stock shareholders, along with the importance of shareholders exercising their ... Read Answer >>
  3. Why would a company have multiple share classes, and what are super voting shares?

    Firstly, do not confuse different classes of common stock with preferred stock. Preferred shares are an entirely different ... Read Answer >>
  4. What happens to the voting rights on shares when the shares are used in a short sale ...

    The registered owner of the security, known as the holder of record, is the investor who retains voting rights. This means ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between Class A shares and other common shares of company's ...

    Discover how a company can break down its common stock into multiple classes and how these classes differ from one another ... Read Answer >>
  6. Do convertible bonds have voting rights?

    Convertible bonds usually have no voting rights until they are converted. Even after conversion, they may not be granted ... Read Answer >>
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