Voting Shares

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DEFINITION of 'Voting Shares'

Shares that give the stockholder the right to vote on matters of corporate policy making as well as who will compose the members of the board of directors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Voting Shares'

Different classes of shares, such as preferred stock, sometimes don't allow for voting rights.

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    There are a number of ways companies can raise funds to finance upcoming projects, expansion and other high costs associated ... Read Full Answer >>
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  4. If I own a stock in a company, do I get a say in the company's operations?

    You don't get a direct say in a company's day-to-day operations, but, depending on whether you own voting or non-voting stock, ... Read Full Answer >>
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