Voucher Check

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DEFINITION of 'Voucher Check'

A two-part combination of a check and voucher. Also known as a remittance advice, the voucher details the reason for the payment by the issuer of the check. The recipient of the voucher check detaches the voucher and retains it for record-keeping before cashing the check.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Voucher Check'

Voucher checks that are used in computerized accounting systems have three parts that together fit on standard A4-sized sheets of paper for ease of use in printers. In addition to a check and voucher, a three-part voucher check has a check stub that is retained by the issuer. Perforations make the different sections easy to separate.

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