Voucher

What is a 'Voucher'

A voucher is a document recording a liability or allowing for the payment of a liability, or debt. A voucher would be held by the person or company who will receive payment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Voucher'

For example, if a supplier has documentation that provides evidence that they are owed money for supplies they sold, they would have a voucher. Vouchers are used as evidence that a transaction has taken place and that there is a liability by one of the parties to the transaction.

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