W-4 Form

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DEFINITION of 'W-4 Form'

A form completed by an employee to indicate his or her tax situation (exemptions, status, etc.) to the employer. The W-4 form tells the employer the correct amount of tax to withhold from an employee's paycheck.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'W-4 Form'

Remember that you can file a new W-4 anytime your situation changes. A change in status can result in more or less tax being withheld.

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    Since yearly income is viewed by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as the total amount of income a person has made over ... Read Full Answer >>
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