Waiting Period


DEFINITION of 'Waiting Period'

1. The period of time between filing a registration statement with the SEC and the registration statement being declared effective by the SEC. Also known as the "quiet period" and the "cooling-off period".

2. The time between the filing of an insurance claim and the payments made on the claim. Also known as the "elimination period".

BREAKING DOWN 'Waiting Period'

1. This is one part of the IPO process during which the issuing company is limited in its announcements to the public. This period of time can last up to three months.

2. Typically, the longer the waiting period on an insurance claim, the cheaper the policy will be for the holder.

  1. Red Herring

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  3. Quiet Period

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  4. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
  5. Elimination Period

    The length of time between when an injury or illness begins and ...
  6. Issue

    1. The process of offering securities as an attempt to raise ...
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