Waiting Period

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Waiting Period'

1. The period of time between filing a registration statement with the SEC and the registration statement being declared effective by the SEC. Also known as the "quiet period" and the "cooling-off period".

2. The time between the filing of an insurance claim and the payments made on the claim. Also known as the "elimination period".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Waiting Period'

1. This is one part of the IPO process during which the issuing company is limited in its announcements to the public. This period of time can last up to three months.

2. Typically, the longer the waiting period on an insurance claim, the cheaper the policy will be for the holder.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Red Herring

    A preliminary prospectus filed by a company with the Securities ...
  2. Long-Term Care (LTC) Insurance

    Coverage that provides nursing-home care, home-health care, personal ...
  3. Final Prospectus

    1. The final version of a prospectus for a public offering of ...
  4. Quiet Period

    In terms of an IPO, the period where an issuer is subject to ...
  5. Issue

    1. The process of offering securities as an attempt to raise ...
  6. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What kinds of costs are included in Free on Board (FOB) shipping?

    Free on board (FOB) shipping is a trade term published by the International Chamber of Commerce or ICC, that indicates which ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some of the major regulatory agencies responsible for overseeing financial ...

    There are a number of agencies assigned to regulate and oversee financial institutions and financial markets, including the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How did the Dodd-Frank Act change whistleblower protection and processes?

    In 2010, the Dodd-Frank Act strengthened and expanded the existing whistleblower program promulgated by the Sarbanes-Oxley ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the pros and cons of holding a non-controlling interest in a company?

    Most investors hold a non-controlling interest – also known as a minority interest – of the companies in which they own shares. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do corporate actions affect floating stock?

    Corporate actions, defined as a company's actions that affect the amount of outstanding company stock shares, can either ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between shares outstanding and floating stock?

    Shares outstanding and floating stock are different measures of the shares of a particular stock. Shares outstanding is the ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Interpreting A Company's IPO Prospectus Report

    Learn to decipher the secret language of the IPO prospectus report - it can tell you a lot about a company's future.
  2. Investing

    5 Tips For Investing In IPOs

    Thinking of investing in IPOs? Here are five things to remember before jumping into these murky waters.
  3. Home & Auto

    Taking The Surprise Out Of Long-Term Care

    Don't be caught unprepared - find out what to look for in LTC insurance policies.
  4. Insurance

    Who Needs Extortion Insurance?

    Insurance can help mitigate the financial damage of an extortion plot, but it’s important to read the fine print before taking out one of these policies.
  5. Insurance

    Indexed Universal Life Insurance: The Pros & Cons

    What you need to know, to see if these vehicles fit into your financial plan.
  6. Entrepreneurship

    Employment Negotiations: What To Ask For & How

    Improving their first offer: What you should know
  7. Insurance

    Do You Need Kidnap & Ransom Insurance?

    Americans working abroad – and high-profile individuals traveling frequently in kidnapping hot spots – should consider this type of protection.
  8. Insurance

    A Guide To Kidnap & Ransom Insurance

    Every year, thousands of people are kidnapped for ransom all over the world. This insurance offers protection – and peace of mind.
  9. Economics

    What Happens in a Carve-Out?

    A carve-out happens when a corporation isolates part of its business and shares those profits with a third party.
  10. Insurance

    Should I Insure My Wedding Ring?

    It depends, in part, on the ring's value and your current insurance coverage. Here's a guide to making a decision that's right for you.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  2. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  3. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  4. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  5. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  6. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!