Waiver Of Demand


DEFINITION of 'Waiver Of Demand'

An agreement by the party that has endorsed a check or draft to accept legal responsibility, without being formally notified, should the original issuer of the check or draft default. The waiver of demand may be express or implied; it may also be oral or written unless oral waivers are specifically prohibited by law.

BREAKING DOWN 'Waiver Of Demand'

The term also refers to a bank's waiver of its right to formal notification when it presents short-term negotiable debt instruments such as drafts or banker's acceptances to a Federal Reserve bank for rediscounting. In such instances, the Federal Reserve considers the bank's endorsement as a "waiver of demand, notice and protest" if the original issuer defaults on its debt obligation.

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