Waiver Of Premium Rider

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DEFINITION

A clause in an insurance policy that waives the policyholder's obligation to pay any further premiums should he or she become seriously ill or disabled. A waiver of premium allows people to benefit from an insurance policy, even when they cannot work.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

For an upfront charge, most insurance companies will incorporate a waiver of premium into a policy. The waiver is usually associated with life insurance policies, and requires the policyholder to be disabled for a specified amount of time, such as being incapacitated for six months. To have a waiver of premium, some companies may also place other requirements on the policyholder, such as being healthy and below a certain age.


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