Weighted Average Market Capitalization

What is the 'Weighted Average Market Capitalization'

The weighted average market capitalization is a stock market index weighted by the market capitalization of each stock in the index. In such a weighting scheme, larger companies account for a greater portion of the index. Most indexes are constructed in this manner, with the best example being the S&P 500.

BREAKING DOWN 'Weighted Average Market Capitalization'

For example, if a company's market capitalization is $1 million and the market capitalization of all stocks in the index is $100 million, then the company would be worth 1% of the index. The alternative to weighting by market cap is a price-weighted index such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How is the value of the S&P 500 calculated?

    The S&P 500 is a U.S. market index that gives investors an idea of the overall movement in the U.S. equity market. The ... Read Answer >>
  2. What does the S&P 500 index measure and how is it calculated?

    Learn about what exactly the S&P measures and why it's used by market participants as a tool to understand the broader stock ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is a capitalization-weighted index?

    Learn about a capitalization-weighted index and how to calculate the value of a capitalization-weighted index through a simple ... Read Answer >>
  4. What are the pros and cons of using the S&P 500 as a benchmark?

    Learn about the advantages and disadvantages of using the S&P 500 as a benchmark for portfolio performance, and understand ... Read Answer >>
  5. Is it possible to invest in an index?

    First, let's review the definition of an index. An index is essentially an imaginary portfolio of securities representing ... Read Answer >>
  6. What's the difference between the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500?

    The major difference between these two indexes is that the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) includes a price-weighted ... Read Answer >>
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