Warehouse-To-Warehouse Clause

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DEFINITION of 'Warehouse-To-Warehouse Clause '

A clause in an insurance policy that provides for coverage of cargo in transit. A warehouse-to-warehouse clause usually covers cargo from the moment it leaves the origin-warehouse until the moment it arrives at the destination-warehouse. Separate coverage is necessary to insure the cargo while it is being stored in either warehouse.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Warehouse-To-Warehouse Clause '

For example, a warehouse-to-warehouse clause could protect the owner of a large clothing shipment while it was being transported on a truck from a warehouse in Hong Kong to the port in Hong Kong, then by boat from a port in Hong Kong to a port in Los Angeles, and finally while it was transported via train from the Los Angeles port to a warehouse in Las Vegas.

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