Warehouse-To-Warehouse Clause


DEFINITION of 'Warehouse-To-Warehouse Clause '

A clause in an insurance policy that provides for coverage of cargo in transit. A warehouse-to-warehouse clause usually covers cargo from the moment it leaves the origin-warehouse until the moment it arrives at the destination-warehouse. Separate coverage is necessary to insure the cargo while it is being stored in either warehouse.

BREAKING DOWN 'Warehouse-To-Warehouse Clause '

For example, a warehouse-to-warehouse clause could protect the owner of a large clothing shipment while it was being transported on a truck from a warehouse in Hong Kong to the port in Hong Kong, then by boat from a port in Hong Kong to a port in Los Angeles, and finally while it was transported via train from the Los Angeles port to a warehouse in Las Vegas.

  1. Warehouse Bond

    A type of financial protection that assures an individual or ...
  2. Warehouser's Liability Form

    A document that describes the obligations of a storage facility ...
  3. Substandard Insurance

    An insurance policy issued to someone who does not qualify for ...
  4. Warehouse Financing

    A form of inventory financing in which loans are made to manufacturers ...
  5. Warehouse Receipt

    A receipt used in futures markets to guarantee the quantity and ...
  6. Warehousing

    1. A procedure whereby a company gradually builds up a holding ...
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    The History Of Insurance

    The first written policy appeared in Hammurabi's Code. Find out how it evolved from there.
  2. Home & Auto

    Cover Your Company With Liability Insurance

    Every business is susceptible to legal action. Find out how to protect yours.
  3. Investing Basics

    Explaining the Real Effective Exchange Rate

    The REER is a measure of the weighted average of a country’s currency against an inflation-adjusted and trade-weighted index of other currencies.
  4. Investing

    What a Fed Delay Means for the ECB & BoJ

    The Fed’s continued delay has repercussions for more than just the U.S. economy and markets. The ECB and the BoJ may support the case for stocks in Europe.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Income Inequality

    Income inequality refers to the uneven distribution of income across a single economy.
  6. Economics

    Who is a Hawk?

    In the economic sense of the word, a hawk is someone who believes high interest rates should be maintained to keep inflation low.
  7. Investing Basics

    Explaining Fixed Exchange Rates

    A government using a fixed exchange rate has linked the value of its currency to the value of another country’s currency, or the price of gold.
  8. Investing

    Latin America’s Economic Forecast

    After a ten-year run, the economies of Latin America are in a decline. For sustainable, long-term growth, the region needs structural reforms.
  9. Economics

    Why the Euro Failed to Become the World's Reserve Currency

    Examine the current state of the U.S. dollar as the world's reserve currency; learn the major reasons why the euro has failed to replace it in that capacity.
  10. Economics

    The 4 Countries That Produce the Most Food

    Learn about the four food superpowers -- China, India, the United States and Brazil -- and what sets them apart from the rest of the world.
  1. How do I choose which insurance company to use?

    Picking an insurance company to use is not an easy task, considering the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009. Several financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is multiline insurance?

    The term "multiline insurance" can refer to multiline contracts and multiline insurers, so let's take a look at both variations. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is reinsurance?

    Reinsurance occurs when multiple insurance companies share risk by purchasing insurance policies from other insurers to limit ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why is my insurance premium so high/low?

    Insurance premiums can be affected by many factors including: type and amount of risk size of deductible amount of coverage age ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a peril and a hazard?

    The two related terms "peril" and "hazard" are often used in reference to the insurance industry. Essentially, a peril is ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When do I need a letter of credit?

    A letter of credit, sometimes referred to as a documentary credit, acts as a promissory note from a financial institution, ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  2. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  3. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  4. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  5. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  6. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!