Warrant Coverage


DEFINITION of 'Warrant Coverage'

An agreement between a company and its shareholders whereby the company issues warrants equal to some percentage of the dollar amount of the shareholder's investment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Warrant Coverage'

For example, if an investor purchases 1,000,000 shares of stock at a price of $5 per share (a $5,000,000 investment), and the company grants 20% warrant coverage, the company issues to the investor $1,000,000 in warrants or, in technical terms, warrants 200,000 additional shares at an exercise price of $5 per share.

This would not give the investor any additional downside protection as the underlying shares would be issued at the same price that is currently paid for the stock. However, the warrant coverage would give the investor additional upside in the event that the company goes public or is sold at a price above $5 per share.

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