Warsaw Stock Exchange - WSE

DEFINITION of 'Warsaw Stock Exchange - WSE'

The largest stock exchange in eastern Europe, located in Warsaw Poland. Trading started on April 16, 1991, and the exchange ballooned to a market capitalization of approximately $200 billion (EUR) in six years. Instruments such as shares, bonds and various derivative products can all be traded electronically on this exchange. The WSE is a joint-stock company founded by the state treasury.

BREAKING DOWN 'Warsaw Stock Exchange - WSE'

Many economists expect that Eastern Europe will continue to be an area of rapid growth in the foreseeable future and the Warsaw Stock Exchange will be sure to benefit from the increased investment.

The first companies listed on the exchange were: Tonsil, Prochnik, Krosno, Kable and Exbud.

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