Wash Trading


DEFINITION of 'Wash Trading'

The process of buying shares of a company through one broker while selling shares through a different broker. Wash trading can also make a stock's volume appear to have a lot of activity resulting from the repeated buying and selling done by an individual or firm when, in fact, the shares have never changed owners.

BREAKING DOWN 'Wash Trading'

Wash trading is illegal, as it is done in order to manipulate the market and prompt other investors into buying the position. A quick turnaround in positions isn't considered wash trading, as long as the transaction creates market risk for the trader and changes their market position, even if only temporarily.

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  1. Is there a situation in which wash trading is legal?

    Wash trading, the intentional practice of manipulating a stock's activity level to deceive other investors, is not a legal ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between wash trading and insider trading?

    Wash trading is an illegal trading activity that artificially pumps up trading volume in a stock without the stock ever changing ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do traders, market makers, specialists or others ever deliberately drive a stock's ...

    Many individual investors have had the experience of closing their position in a stock only to see the price rebound moments ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How often do mutual funds report their holdings?

    The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires mutual funds to report complete lists of their holdings on a quarterly ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between shares outstanding and floating stock?

    Shares outstanding and floating stock are different measures of the shares of a particular stock. Shares outstanding is the ... Read Full Answer >>

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