Water Exclusion Clause

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DEFINITION of 'Water Exclusion Clause '

A restriction in a homeowner's or renter's insurance policy that denies coverage for certain water-related claims. Types of water damage that are likely to fall under a water exclusion clause include damage caused by flood, tsunami, standing water, groundwater and drain/sewage backup. Some types of excluded water damage can be insured by purchasing a rider, while others cannot be covered at all or can only be covered through a separate policy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Water Exclusion Clause '

Water damage is one of several types of exclusion clauses commonly found in homeowners' and renters' insurance policies. Other common exclusions include earthquakes, landslides, war, nuclear hazards and government action. On the other hand, losses that most policies do cover include fire, wind, hail, vehicle damage, vandalism, theft, and falling objects, among other losses.



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