White Squire

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DEFINITION of 'White Squire'

Very similar to a "white knight", but instead of purchasing a majority interest, the squire purchases a lesser interest in the target firm.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'White Squire'

A white squire is still considered to be a friendly acquirer, they just don't require controlling interest like a "white knight" does.

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