Wholesale Insurance

A A A

DEFINITION

Coverage for employer groups that are too small to qualify for true group coverage. The wholesale insurance policy covers an entire group, though individual policies are written for each person that is to be insured.


Also known as franchise insurance.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Wholesale insurance is sold to members of a group with rates based on individual rates, typically with some type of discount based on expense savings. Wholesale health insurance, for example, is essentially an individual health plan that is provided to groups of people in companies that have fewer than 10 employees. In this case, each employee can purchase a policy, or in some instances, the employer would pay the premiums as part of an employee benefits package.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Wholesale Life Insurance

    A type of employer-sponsored protection against the loss of income in the event ...
  2. Wrap-Around Insurance Program

    Provides punitive damages insurance for employment practices liability claims. ...
  3. Adequacy Of Coverage

    The adequacy of coverage concerns how well your insurance policies protect your ...
  4. Wholesale Banking

    Banking services between merchant banks and other financial institutions. Wholesale ...
  5. Variable Annuity

    An insurance contract in which, at the end of the accumulation stage, the insurance ...
  6. Life Insurance

    A protection against the loss of income that would result if the insured passed ...
  7. Life Annuity

    An insurance product that features a predetermined periodic payout amount until ...
  8. Pension Risk Transfer

    When a defined benefit pension provider offloads some or all of the plan’s ...
  9. Ltd. (Limited)

    An abbreviation of "limited," Ltd. is a suffix that follows the name ...
  10. BHD (Berhad)

    The suffix Bhd. is an abbreviation of a Malay word "berhad," which ...
Related Articles
  1. Can I Get Life Insurance?
    Insurance

    Can I Get Life Insurance?

  2. 5 Insurance Policies Everyone Should ...
    Home & Auto

    5 Insurance Policies Everyone Should ...

  3. The History Of Insurance In America
    Home & Auto

    The History Of Insurance In America

  4. 7 Smart Steps Every New Homeowner Should ...
    Budgeting

    7 Smart Steps Every New Homeowner Should ...

  5. Variable Vs. Variable Universal Life ...
    Retirement

    Variable Vs. Variable Universal Life ...

  6. 15 Insurance Policies You Don't Need
    Insurance

    15 Insurance Policies You Don't Need

  7. Life Insurance: Putting A Price On Peace ...
    Insurance

    Life Insurance: Putting A Price On Peace ...

  8. Medicaid Vs. Long-Term Care Insurance ...
    Insurance

    Medicaid Vs. Long-Term Care Insurance ...

  9. 20 Investments You Should Know
    Options & Futures

    20 Investments You Should Know

  10. Passing Boomers Will Leave A Big Economic ...
    Investing Basics

    Passing Boomers Will Leave A Big Economic ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. XW

    A symbol used to signify that a security is trading ex-warrant. XW is one of many alphabetic qualifiers that act as a shorthand to tell investors key information about a specific security in a stock quote. These qualifiers should not be confused with ticker symbols, some of which, like qualifiers, are just one or two letters.
  2. Quanto Swap

    A swap with varying combinations of interest rate, currency and equity swap features, where payments are based on the movement of two different countries' interest rates. This is also referred to as a differential or "diff" swap.
  3. Genuine Progress Indicator - GPI

    A metric used to measure the economic growth of a country. It is often considered as a replacement to the more well known gross domestic product (GDP) economic indicator. The GPI indicator takes everything the GDP uses into account, but also adds other figures that represent the cost of the negative effects related to economic activity (such as the cost of crime, cost of ozone depletion and cost of resource depletion, among others).
  4. Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR

    A specific method by which corporations can repurchase outstanding shares of their stock. The accelerated share repurchase (ASR) is usually accomplished by the corporation purchasing shares of its stock from an investment bank. The investment bank borrows the shares from clients or share lenders and sells them to the company.
  5. Microeconomic Pricing Model

    A model of the way prices are set within a market for a given good. According to this model, prices are set based on the balance of supply and demand in the market. In general, profit incentives are said to resemble an "invisible hand" that guides competing participants to an equilibrium price. The demand curve in this model is determined by consumers attempting to maximize their utility, given their budget.
  6. Centralized Market

    A financial market structure that consists of having all orders routed to one central exchange with no other competing market. The quoted prices of the various securities listed on the exchange represent the only price that is available to investors seeking to buy or sell the specific asset.
Trading Center