Wholesale Banking

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DEFINITION of 'Wholesale Banking'

Banking services between merchant banks and other financial institutions. Wholesale banking deals with larger institutions, where as retail banking would focus more on the individual or smaller business. Some services might include currency conversion, working capital financing and large trade transactions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Wholesale Banking'

This type of banking will provide services to other banks or large corporations. Some retail banking covers business transactions but not in the same scale as wholesale banking. think of it like the discount superstore that deals in such large amounts that they can offer special prices or reduced fees, on a per dollar basis.

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