William H. Gross

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DEFINITION

A well known bond investment manager who is one of America's 400 richest people as of 2009. William Gross is the founder of Pacific Investment Management (PIMCO) and manages their total return fund as well as several other funds. His investment style focuses primarily on fixed-income securities. During the 2008 subprime crisis Gross made a handsome profit on positions in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac after their ownership transfer to the government.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

An avid gambler and stamp collector, William forked over nearly $3 million to obtain a sheet of the famous 1918 "Inverted Jenny" stamps that have a biplane stamped upside down onto them. He also served in the navy and graduated from Duke University, to which he has since donated over $20 million.




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