Woody

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DEFINITION of 'Woody'

Slang to describe when the market has a strong and quick upward movement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Woody'

For example, you'll hear "the market has a woody," when the market is performing well... seriously, we don't make this stuff up.

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