Work Cell

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DEFINITION of 'Work Cell'

The logical and strategic arrangement of resources in a business environment, organized so as to improve process flow, increase efficiency and eliminate wastage. The concept of work cells is based on the platform of lean manufacturing, which focuses on value-creation for the end customer and reduction of wastage. Work cells are typically found in the manufacturing and office environments.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Work Cell'

In a manufacturing facility, the machines involved in the production process would be arranged so that the goods being produced move smoothly and seamlessly from one stage to the next. This would only be possible if the machines are grouped in work cells that facilitate the logical progression of the goods being produced, from raw materials at one end to finished product at the other.


Similarly, in the office context, work cells may facilitate better flow of communication and more efficient use of shared resources.

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