Work Ticket

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Work Ticket'

A form that shows the time spent by an employee working on a particular job. It is used as a basis for billing the costs of direct labor to customers, and may also be used for calculating wages of employees who are paid by the hour.


Also known as time card.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Work Ticket'

For example, a person who has given his car to an automobile shop for several repairs will receive a bill that shows the amount of time spent by different mechanics on various parts of the car, as well as their billing rates. The time spent by each mechanic on the car is derived from the work ticket.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Big Ticket Item

    Big ticket items are high-value items, such as houses and cars, ...
  2. Credit Ticket

    In accounting and bookkeeping, a credit ticket is a transaction ...
  3. Deal Ticket

    A ticket that records all the terms, conditions and basic information ...
  4. Average Ticket

    1. For credit card vendors, a business's average ticket refers ...
  5. Poison Put

    A takeover defense strategy in which the target company issues ...
  6. Assented Stock

    A share of stock owned by a shareholder who has agreed to a takeover.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do modern companies assess business risk?

    Before a business can assess or mitigate business risk, it must first identify probable or likely risks to its bottom line. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why has emphasis on corporate governance grown in the 21st century?

    Corporate governance refers to operational practices, management protocols, and other governing rules or principles by which ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What should a whistleblower do if their employer retaliates?

    Although specifically prohibited by employment law, employer retaliation against whistleblowers for exposing employers' wrongdoings ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What impact did the Sarbanes-Oxley Act have on corporate governance in the United ...

    After a prolonged period of corporate scandals involving large public companies from 2000 to 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why should investors research the C-suite executives of a company?

    C-suite executives are essential for creating and enacting overall firm strategy and are therefore an important aspect of ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between a direct and an indirect distribution channel?

    A direct distribution channel is organized and managed by the firm itself. An indirect distribution channel relies on intermediaries ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    Credit Card Perks You Never Knew You Had

    From car insurance to concert tickets, be sure to take advantage of whatever your card has to offer.
  2. Options & Futures

    Your Car: Fixer-Upper Or Scrap Metal?

    Sometimes buying a new car can be cheaper than shelling out for repairs.
  3. Personal Finance

    Shoulder Season: Your Ticket To The Perfect Vacation

    Traveling during the sweet spot between high season and off season can save you money and stress.
  4. Investing Basics

    Understanding Related-Party Transactions

    In business, a related-party transaction refers to a transaction where parties on both sides have a common interest or relationship.
  5. Investing Basics

    Explaining Tender Offers

    A tender offer is a broad public offer made by a person or company to purchase all or a portion of the shares of a publicly traded company.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Can Japan's Stewardship Code Turn Passive Funds Into Active Managers?

    Institutional investors in Japan have been criticized for being too cozy with corporates. Can a code force them to focus on the needs of beneficiaries?
  7. Investing Basics

    Explaining Non-Controlling Interest

    Technically, a non-controlling interest is any percentage of ownership that is less than 50% of a company’s voting equity.
  8. Investing

    4 Future Jobs In The Sci-Fi Future

    As long as the human race has problems, we'll continue developing new things and ideas to solve those problems.
  9. Entrepreneurship

    Comparing Impact Investing & Venture Philanthropy

    Impact investing and venture philanthropy might be similar, but there are differences and one is more popular than the other right now.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Privatization

    For a publicly traded company, privatization is the act of transitioning the company to ownership by private individuals.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Radner Equilibrium

    A theory suggesting that if economic decision makers have unlimited computational capacity for choice among strategies, then ...
  2. Inbound Cash Flow

    Any currency that a company or individual receives through conducting a transaction with another party. Inbound cash flow ...
  3. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in 1935. The Social Security program's benefits ...
  4. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  5. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  6. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!