Working-Age Population

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DEFINITION of 'Working-Age Population'

The total population in a region, within a set range of ages, that is considered to be able and likely to work. The working-age population measure is used to give an estimate of the total number of potential workers within an economy. Each region may have a different range of ages, but typically the ages of 20 to 65 are used.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Working-Age Population'

This measure considers all individuals in a region between these ages, but doesn't differentiate between those that are actually working and those that are currently unemployed. The working-age population of an economy is always shifting as the demographics of a region change, with large changes having the potential to significantly impact the economy. For example, if you have a relatively small working-age population when compared to the youth and retired segments, the economy will rely on a smaller population to generate revenues while a larger population of youth and retired segments rely on social programs.

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